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The strong winds of climate change have failed to move the opinions of many Americans

The strong winds of climate change have failed to move the opinions of many Americans

Most believe global warming is a problem, but the partisan divide is growing

Even as windstorms became more powerful, wildfires grew more deadly and rising seas made damaging floods more frequent, Americans’ views about the threat of global warming over the past few years remain largely unchanged, a Washington Post-ABC News poll finds.

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A clear majority of adults say that warming is a serious problem, but the share — 67 percent — is about the same as it was seven years ago, when alarms raised by climate scientists were less pronounced than they are now.

The poll, released Friday, also finds that the partisan divide over the issue has widened. The proportion of Democrats who see climate change as an existential threat rose by 11 points to 95 percent over seven years. The increase was driven partly by Black Americans, who are now more likely to say the issue is very serious.

Democratic concern about climate change has grown, but Republican concern has shrunk

Q: Do you think global warming, also known as climate change, is a serious problem facing this country, or not a serious problem? (% saying "serious problem")

“I guess I worry about the future, and I worry about the effects that climate change will have on the planet overall. I’m confused as to why most people aren’t worried,” said Dorothy Gustave, 39, who is Black and lives in Brooklyn. “Mother Nature doesn’t care about your excuses. Mother Nature will kill you. We need to start thinking about ways to fix that.”

Meanwhile, the share of Republicans who say climate change is a serious problem fell by 10 points, to 39 percent, over the same period. The Republican decline in Post-ABC polls tracks with the findings of annual Gallup polls in which Republican concerns dropped after 2017, when Donald Trump took office as president.
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